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Image of the "Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Apps 2019" from Healthline Media
Image of the "Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Apps 2019" from Healthline Media

In a late May article by Healthline, cliexa-RA was named one of the “Best Rheumatoid Arthritis Apps of 2019.” For the second straight year, cliexa-RA has been nominated for this selection, receiving a perfect five stars on the iOS App Store and the highest average score among all apps named. With the extensive features, assessments, accuracy, and patient-physician efficiency included with the application, it is one of the most thorough rheumatoid arthritis apps on the market.

cliexa-RA is a specially designed app for tracking patient progress, medication adherence, and complications from the patient’s smartphone. It includes several medically validated and custom assessments for keeping tabs on patients and providing physicians with accurate and up-to-date information. The app can also use a patient’s medical history and statistical data to more clearly assess patients\’ rheumatoid arthritis progress and therefore help physicians accurately provide treatment plans. The outpatient data helps create efficiency of communication between patient and physician, cutting down on time spent at the clinic and providing more accurate care solutions.

cliexa’s platform implements effective Remote Patient Monitoring to optimize clinical workflow, medical billing compliance, and reimbursements. Accurate outpatient data is essential to the cliexa platform, with cliexa-RA being recognized for its capability to utilize Remote Patient Monitoring effectively.

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The Silicon Review's 30 Best Leaders to Watch in 2019

cliexa’s Founder and CEO, Mehmet Kazgan, is rated as one of the “30 Best Leaders to Watch in 2019” Mehmet was featured in an article highlighting his success as an entrepreneur, and business owner. Mehmet founded cliexa in late 2015 and has been working diligently to grow the company. Mehmet sat down with the Silicon Review team to discuss his experience as a leader in business, and healthcare technology.

Here is a snippet from the article:

“What is your greatest fear, and how do you manage fear?”

“My greatest fear is to over-promise and under-deliver, in any form, within a business or non-business related context. I manage fear by acknowledging it and facing it when the time comes.”

“What were the biggest initial hurdles to building your business and how did you overcome them?”

“Convincing others about my entrepreneurial approach and vision was one of the biggest hurdles. Validating the concept and demonstrating the outcomes was one of the ways I worked to overcome them.”

To read the full article, click HERE.

cliexa is a finalist for the Health Tech Venture Challenge

cliexa makes the finals of the Health Tech Venture Challenge, thanks to Advocate Aurora Health and MATTER.

On November 28, Advocate Aurora Health and MATTER announced the finalists for the Health Tech Venture Challenge. cliexa was selected as one of the five finalists who will have the opportunity to pitch their healthcare technology solutions to leaders and executives from Advocate Aurora Health at MATTER in Chicago on Tuesday, December 11, 2018.

The main goal of this challenge was “how might we transform the primary care experience?” cliexa submitted an application in November to highlight how our solutions can be applied in a primary care setting to transform and improve the patient and provider experience.

The cliexa platform enables physicians and hospitals to fully leverage patient-reported data to improve clinical care and outcomes while maximizing reimbursement. Healthcare providers can seamlessly leverage clinically validated scoring and assessment models and incorporate patient-reported data into EMR systems.

We are very much looking forward to the event. More updates to come following the finals in December.

Here is the link to the announcement: //matter.health/posts/health-tech-venture-challenge-finalists-to-pitch-their-solutions-to-advocate-aurora-health-leaders/

 

Last week, over 12,000 public health professionals flocked to San Diego for the 75-degree weather, ocean views, and the most significant public health conference in the U.S, the American Public Health Association’s Annual Meeting and Expo. Two large buildings downtown were dedicated to housing deep dive conversations about, among other things, tobacco use, obesity, women’s health, racial inequity in health and the most cutting-edge research in the field. In reflection, I had three takeaways from the conference about the role and use of digital health in public health.

#1. Health technology and its benefits are not largely understood in its application to the public health community.

Many times, throughout the conference I found myself reiterating the value of a health platform for clinical, research or evaluation processes. Many people I spoke to had a genuine interest but weren’t sure how technology could optimize their work. In reality, many public health programs and projects are researched and evaluated using patient-reported data. Imagine digitizing that process so patients can participate through an application on their phone; imagine the impact that would have on response rates and loss-to-follow-up. Imagine the benefits of pushing routine surveys to patient’s phone instead of having to call to do scheduled evaluations. Not to mention the equitable distribution of programs and interventions across diverse populations, rural populations and those who have transportation barriers that technology can help address. In public health we operate in a world of outcomes, without being able to show outcomes we don’t see funding renewals, patient participation fades away, and programs fail. Health technology provides a way for researchers and evaluators to track outcomes in real time.

#2. UX/UI can be a major make-or-break when looking at making a tool that applies to diverse or vulnerable populations.

My first event was a meeting in a small room with other health technology professionals discussing the process that they’ve undergone to get health technology recognized as a section at APHA. In this room, we considered the impacts on research, evaluation, follow up, data visualization and overall patient experience. One of the most impactful conversations that I had was with a social worker who embraced technology as a tool for diverse or vulnerable populations. She emphasized how user interface and user experience can shape program success in diverse and vulnerable populations. She encouraged me to reach out to individuals who interact directly with the specific population when designing products to be used in public health settings. Only if the patient or client is engaged with the tool, can we see the successes or obtain accurate information for physicians, for researchers, or health program evaluators. A crucial point when considering Take Away #1, and the importance of highlighting tangible outcomes over time.

#3. There is “data overload” in public health.

This conference had some of the country’s top experts in health, with rows of poster projects, all with their own calculated data sets backing the findings that they were at APHA to present. Some will likely be published while others will remain in the researcher’s computer with little other exposure. I spoke to individuals who were collecting health data, payor data, and policy data, and all were positioning their data sets in different areas independent of each other despite their overwhelming connectivity. With the rate that new studies are conducted, data changes so quickly so even systematic reviews and meta-analyses become outdated far too quickly. There is an opportunity to leverage technology to collect a real-time outcomes database to ensure the hard work that researchers do to make correlations and identify patterns is not lost in the data black hole. Entities such as the CDC, NIH and WHO do an excellent job of collecting and displaying related data sets for public use, however the time that it takes to gather data often puts the data sets months to years behind the times. There is a significant opportunity for technology to lend to this real-time collection process.

Overall, the themes of APHA for me centered around how much opportunity there is to impact the way public health programs are research, delivered and evaluated through the use of digital health. These conversations were inspiring and exciting but also demonstrated how much we still have to do to fully optimize the work that we do in the public health field.

cliexa is a semifinalist in the AHRQ's Step-Up Challenge

cliexa is a semifinalist in the AHRQ's Step-Up Challenge

cliexa is one of 10 companies out of 50+ advancing to Phase 2 of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)‘s Step-Up App Challenge with the “goal of developing an app that integrates standardized patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data into clinical care and research.”

For Phase 2 of the Step Up App Challenge, cliexa will design, develop, and demo our application using the FHIR technical specifications and PROMIS® resources for patient-reported outcomes with the hope to be selected as one of the three winners, who will get the opportunity to test their product in nine practice settings affiliated with MedStar Health in Washington, DC.

Read the blog announcing the 10 semifinalists from Director of the AHRQ, Gopal Khanna, M.B.A: //www.ahrq.gov/news/blog/ahrqviews/stepup-challenge-finalists.html

Check out our portfolio of patient-reported outcomes applications: cliexa Mobile