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cliexa CEO featured in #AskTheCEO podcast

cliexa’s CEO & Founder, Mehmet Kazgan, is featured in the #AskTheCEO Podcast! The #AskTheCEO Podcast host is Avrohom Gottheil, CEO of #AskTheCEO Media.

In this #AskTheCEO episode, Mehmet and Avrohom sit down and discuss the importance of artificial intelligence in healthcare. During the conversation, the two talk about the importance of utilizing innovative technology. This technology is essential in order to stay at the forefront of patient care. As diseases and viruses continue to evolve over time, new healthcare technologies give rise to revolutionary developments. Data collection and AI capabilities are now moving at a pace to evolve and keep up with new diseases and viruses around the world. It is up to the healthcare industry to utilize tools like cliexa in order to compile data and start improving patient outcomes.

cliexa allows for efficient tracking of data, allowing physicians to compile information and make better, more informed decisions on patient treatment plans. This is based on patient outcomes, symptoms, and treatment plans over time. This way, physicians can collect data on what treatments are more effective than others. They can also track patient medication management

Through AI capabilities, cliexa can help to predict optimized treatment plans based on past data collected. Now that cliexa is available on the Azure Marketplace, more physicians and healthcare systems can implement this technology. The Azure Marketplace offers digital platforms to improve healthcare efficiency for users. To learn more about cliexa’s capabilities and how they can benefit patients, physicians, and payors, contact us to schedule a demo here.

 

 

 

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The cliexa platform is now available on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace!

Microsoft Azure Marketplace provides applications for a range of purposes, including AI & machine learning, analytics, and blockchain. cliexa’s feature in the Azure Marketplace is an exciting step for our team. This promotion attests to the platform’s credibility and success over the years.

Microsoft Azure allows cliexa to reach the hands of many healthcare professionals and patients that desire better solutions. Many problems currently face the healthcare industry. Issues like physician burnout, patient to provider communication, and rejected reimbursements are all addressed with cliexa. The availability of cliexa on Azure Marketplace helps introduce an innovative solution to healthcare systems across the country.

How Does this Help cliexa and the Healthcare Industry?

Allowing healthcare professionals to search for a desirable digital platform when they are ready to adopt innovative technology is key. Azure Marketplace helps to promote the cliexa platform and make this helpful technology available to more clinicians who need to save time, money, and increase compliance and reimbursements.

Many healthcare clinics have adopted the cliexa platform and seen great success. New Health Services adopted the cliexa platform in 2019 and has seen a significant decrease in costs. They have decreased over 2.5 hours spent each day on intake documentation, billing documents, and information integration into the EMR. Over time, these hours translate into valuable cost savings for users of the cliexa platform.

transition to digital intake forms give more opportunities

 

In addition to costs, the cliexa platform integrates patient engagement right into the client’s existing EMR. The various specialty platforms allow for the communication of patient-reported outcomes to allow physicians to better treat patients suffering from chronic illness over time. In summary, the platform provides benefits for physicians, patients, and payors alike.

With the cliexa platform now available on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, customers can now purchase and deploy the platform and reap the many benefits of utilizing this innovative software. cliexa’s platform can benefit many more healthcare clinicians and, in turn, help create better outcomes for patients.

Learn more about the cliexa platform by visiting our page on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace!

 

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American College of Cardiology Conference 2020

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) annual conference hosts colleagues from across the industry to collaborate and facilitate discussions around innovation. The ACC.20 conference takes place on March 28-30 in Chicago. cliexa is excited to announce that we will be attending for the second year in a row! Join cliexa at the ACC.20 conference and schedule a demo with our team here!

 

In addition, cliexa’s CEO & Founder, Mehmet Kazgan, will be participating in an open conversation at ACC.20 about mobile healthcare apps. A popular theme in today’s digital healthcare world is to discuss ways to increase patient engagement within a treatment plan. Therefore, the mobile healthcare industry is moving towards increased communication between patients and physicians through smartphone applications. cliexa’s technology allows for an integrated platform with any EMR that seamlessly connects patients and physicians. Equally important, the app improves the accuracy in patient data collection to utilize in reimbursements.

 

On Monday, March 30 from 9:45am – 11:15am, Mehmet will be participating in this open discussion with two other industry leaders on the topic of mobile healthcare applications. This ‘Knowledge and Networking’ session will be an interesting event to sit in on – and you can add it to your conference itinerary beforehand here. Along with Mehmet, the session leaders include Arash Harzand, MD, MBA, and Francoise Marvel, MD. Also, attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and lead discussions around this engaging topic during the session.

 

UPDATE 3/9/2020: ACC.20 has been cancelled due to growing coronavirus concerns. Please visit the ACC website for updates and more information.

Doctor looks at the patient's electronic chart on the tablet. Health care concept. 3d isometric. Concept for web design-01

Overview of the Physician Burnout Problem

The demanding work pace, time constraints, and emotional fatigue are the aspects that make physicians vulnerable to burnout. Symptoms caused by long-term stress such as depersonalization, low sense of accomplishment and emotional disparity due to work-life imbalance make the doctor prone to exhaustion leading to a feeling of quitting.

The WHO terms burnout as an ‘occupational phenomenon’ which, in its latest update of the definition, is referred to as a ‘syndrome’ that occurs due to chronic work stress that is not effectively managed.  The physician burnout is metaphorically referred to as the bank account of energy.

There are three main types of energy; physical, emotional and spiritual energy that keeps on adding up and depleting with time and circumstances. The highly demanding doctors’ profession and the workplace norms generally have a downward trend towards energy levels that puts clinicians at a high risk of burnout. 

According to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2019, Physician burnout costs around $ 4.6 billion to the United States. Dr. Lotte Dyrbye of Mayoclinic opines that whoever enrolls in medicine is aware of the fact that it is a demanding and stressful profession.

Over the past years, the sprouting cases of physician burnout have led to cynicism about its repercussive effects on patient access to care, care quality as well as patient safety. Burning out inflicts the doctors to quit their jobs making access to care, less likely. Lack of attention and focus, as well as memory constraints, hamper patient safety and quality of care.

According to several studies, 1 out of every 3 physicians is suffering from burnout at a time. Thus, every physician precisely is at risk of burnout and it rightly needs to be dealt with as a crisis. Although the physicians can take the necessary steps themselves to improve the work-life conditions and keep the burnout symptoms at bay, big changes are needed at the institutional level to bring forth evident outcomes.

A recent report from Harvard states that physician burnout is a public health catastrophe that urgently needs a solution. Among the recommendations stated by the report, changes to the practice of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) or Electronic Health Record (EHR) are declared to be a significant measure to provide a medium-term solution for physician burnout.

Problems that are focused on EMR-related issues

The patient record used to be written on paper for ages and has consumed an ever-increasing space and remarkably deferred access to proficient medical care. As of today, EMRs collect individual patient data and clinical information electronically, facilitating immediate accessibility of this information to all healthcare providers. It is thus said to assist the provision of coherent and regular care.

Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are automated medical information systems that assemble, store and present patient information. They are a way to produce reliable and structured recordings to access clinical data about patients. Hence, EMRs have replaced paper-based medical records which most practitioners have been long familiar with.

There are a number of potential advantages EMR is known for. These include

  • Optimizing the records of the patients
  • Improving communication of patient data to clinicians
  • Improving access to patients’ healthcare information
  • A substantial decline in errors
  • Optimizing payments and advancement in reimbursement for services
  • Formation of a data storage area for research and quality enhancement
  • Reduction of the use of paper

EMRs are envisioned to have great potential for enhancing quality, stability, protection, and efficacy in healthcare. These are the reasons why they are being implemented throughout the world.

In spite of the high expectations and focus on the technology worldwide, there are several EMR-related issues associated with them that have kept their overall implementation rate relatively low. They are viewed to oppose a physician’s customary working style and also entail the following barriers to acceptance by physicians.

  1. Financial Barriers

    EMRs necessitate a greater competence in dealing with computers. Further, installing a system entails significant financial resources; high startup expenditure, high maintenance cost as well as uncertainty about Return on Investment (ROI).

  2. Technical barriers

    Lack of computer skills of the clinicians and the other staff, deficiency of technical training and support, complexity and limitation of the system, etc. are the factors considered as technical barriers to EMRs.

  3. Time constraints

    The physicians find it too time-consuming to select, purchase and implement the system, to learn the system, to enter data, to convert the records and requiring more time per patient. 

  4. Psychological barriers

    Based on their personal reservations, understanding, and perceptions, clinicians have concerns about using EMRS. Their observation of the uncertain quality improvement associated with EMRs and doubts about the loss of specialized autonomy lead to a lack of belief in the EMR.

  5. Social barriers

    The social barriers include uncertainty about the vendor, lack of support from external parties, from other colleagues and from the management. Also, the physicians find EMR to be a system that interferes with the doctor-patient relationship.

  6. Legal barriers

    Clinicians think that keeping the patient records and medical information safe is vital to avoid legal issues. Nonetheless, there is a lack of clarity about the security standards to keep the patient records safe and confidential. 

  7. Organizational size and type

    A small practice is estimated to face greater difficulties in working out the financial issues than a large practice.

  8. Change process

    Implementation of EMRs in the medical practices demands a major change for clinicians who have their own working styles developed over the years. This renders them unwilling to adapt to variations in their methodology of work. Therefore, the change process is a challenge as well as a problem at the same time. Problems that occur during the change process include a lack of suitable organizational culture, lack of incentives, lack of leadership and reluctance in participation from physicians, nurses and other staff members.

According to a study, the slow rate of EMRs adoption implies the fact that resistance amongst medical doctors is strong. This is because the clinicians are the frontline users of EMRs and whether or not the other user-groups like nurses and administrative staff support and use EMRs, largely depends on EMR’s acceptability by the clinicians. Consequently, doctors have a great influence on the adoption level of EMRs. 

Additionally, a study found that most of the physicians who are stressed out are due to the work conditions and time pressures. The family responsibilities, time demands, chaotic environment at workplace, lack of control of the pace, unfavorable institutional culture; all are attributes associated with dissatisfied and stressed out doctors who inculcate a feeling of switching fields. However, these factors, not necessarily translate into poor patient care by the doctors. However, when a drop in the patient care quality was seen, it was rather due to burnout caused by the organization than by the doctors themselves.

The study also found that the implementation of the EMR contributed to burnout instead of reducing the stress levels as it was hoped. It was claimed that practices that implemented EMR caused an increase in stress to the doctors, the levels of which then reduced as the use of EMR matured. However, the stress level was never found to drop to the lowest. Furthermore, it was found that the fully established EMR systems, particularly coupled with shorter visits caused burnout, stress and an intention to leave the practice.

Causes of the EMR-Related Issues

Like all other technologies, EMRs can be used in a variety of ways for a variety of purposes. In regards to our current healthcare structure, one important performance requirement of EMRs is to generate clinical revenues. This means that it should support physicians’ billing and documentation to produce as much revenue as possible for each medical service. Moreover, EMRs should also help clinicians meet regulatory necessities that may have monetary or endorsement implications.

This implies that existing EMRs are not designed in a way so as to support many of the matters that clinicians, patients, and policy-makers value including improved care experiences, decreased cost, improved care quality, and inhabitants’ health management. Current EMRs have not been created to facilitate the physicians to improve in their diagnoses or become more cost-effective prescribers. This is because the present-day health care system generally does not compensate for these actions.

Having said so, EMRs have very minimum capacity pertaining to clinical decision making (which increases the quality of care), for the data collection on duplicate and needless tests, or on the collective health of the patients.

Simply put, the advancement of the EMRs will necessitate the changing of prime considerations regulating their design. This includes moving towards risk-sharing by clinicians and eventually, some form of potential reimbursement rather than the current fee-for-service culture. Till then, optimizing the usability and worth of EMRs will be an ascending effort.

READ NEXT: cliexa Partners with the athenahealth Marketplace Program

Mobile Health Applications - Value Based Care

In today’s healthcare system, there is a focus on creating a value-based care system to foster a standard of effectiveness, and efficiency when it comes to patient health outcomes, and reduced costs. Through this model, healthcare providers are incentivized to deliver high quality care and this value is derived from measuring health outcomes over time. There is significant pressure that many providers face to be able to quantify their patient’s health outcomes in order to show they are in fact delivering “value-based care.” A value-based model creates a need for a fruitful cross-communication system that extends to patients, providers, payers, and all involved in the healthcare system in order to quantify and qualify health measures.

In a effort to utilize patient-reported health status to improve care, cliexa is collaborating with the American College of Cardiology to develop technical modules targeting cardiology-specific diseases using remote patient monitoring. The first module, cliexa-PULSE, has been developed is for Atrial Fibrillation and includes patient-reported symptom tracking, medication reconciliation functions, connections to wearable data and claims data connection. This information will fulfill reporting needs for patients through visual tracking graphics in the application and to physicians in a summarized, customized manner. Moving forward we are looking to commercialize this product through the ACC’s 2,500 members and beyond.

Improved communication and reduced costs can be achieved by improving patient engagement, streamlining clinical workflow, and implementing a customizable technology that will automate clinical processes, analyze and simplify patient data, which can lead to improved care and health outcomes. By the incorporation of patients’ health status and value via patient-reported outcomes (PROs), providers can monitor the quality of health care delivery.

PROs can be used as absolute terms, or as a change from a previous result as well as a measurement in clinical trials. Physicians can better determine baseline status, clinical trial endpoints, monitor therapy effectiveness, assess change in stats and prognosis predictor, while the patient experiences positive impacts on daily activities, emotional wellbeing, psychological health, and social function. In addition, PROs can aid clinics to improve patient outcomes, quality of life and satisfaction by using the PROs to better inform their care. PROs prioritize the important details in a clinical encounter and aid a better understanding of the motivation behind patient behavioral change. With this information, the clinic can analyze the evidence, design clinical trials and change their practice and policy. In addition, PROs can aid clinics to improve patient outcomes, quality of life and satisfaction by using the data to better inform their care. PROs prioritize the important details in a clinical encounter and aid a better understanding of the motivation behind patient behavioral change. With this information, the clinic can analyze the evidence, design clinical trials and change their practice and policy.

Patient-centered data collection outside of a traditional clinical is the next frontier of modern healthcare. By digitizing and automating PROs, both patients and physicians benefit financially and through effective time management. PROs tackle the challenge of long surveys, care integration, multimorbid patients, and improving the relationship between patient and provider. Clinicians need instruments (surveys) to capture patient-reported measures of symptom status, functional status and health-related quality of life. PROs help quantify the disease from patients’ perspectives, makes disease- specific measures more sensitive and relevant, help meet all the requirements of performance measures and can improve the process of delivering clinical care while bringing the patients’ voices into care. Physicians have found that PROs, in the right setting with the right workflow, are a helpful mechanism for shared decision making and help tackle the treatment goals of patient survival, free of hospitalization, and increased quality of life.

Read more from ACC: //www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2019/04/14/12/42/innovation-at-acc-collaboration-using-patient-reported-health-status-to-improve-care